Veggie black pudding?

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Vegetarian black pudding. Now there’s an oxymoron. Why would a person who prides themselves on eating only vegetables be interested in buying something specifically created to impersonate meat?
It’s a bit like the mysteries of vegetarian haggis or those flat things described as fillets that lurk in the veggie section of frozen food cabinets and look (plus often taste) like insoles for trainers.
Black puddings were borne from a culture of butchery and offal which is present across Europe in the blood sausage and so would appear to me to be the culinary equivalent of the anti-Christ to any serious meat-free fan.
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But regardless of that mystery of the veggie mindset, I was intrigued to see the world’s first V Pudding on sale in Manchester city centre’s markets and just had to give it a try.
My inquiry about what went into this bloodless sausage was met with a detailed response delivered by a woman who had obviously been asked the same question at least ten times that day. Patiently she explained that even the most blood-thirsty pudding has heaps of ingredients which are already suitable for vegetarians – herbs, spices, oats etc. and so it was just the blood and the fat that had been replaced with vegetable oil.
After a quick taste on the stall I parted with my £2 and came up with my own recipe for it which you can try here.
For the record the V Pud tastes mainly of herbs, it’s slightly spicy and has a dense, moist texture. It’s a pleasant flavour and, although it didn’t fool my black pudding eating husband into thinking it was the “real thing”, he found it an enjoyable treat which could as easily be supper as breakfast.
In fact I think it’s a product that deserves being named as a Veggie Hero even though it’s slightly outside my normal rules.
The staff at the Real Lancashire Black Pudding stall also told me that since its launch last year, the V Pud has become their single biggest seller – just shows what I know about the vegetarian psyche!
Go on, tell me your thoughts about vegetarian meat-style products. I’d love to know.

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20 thoughts on “Veggie black pudding?

  1. Veggie Black Pudding- yet more silliness, presumably from the people who thought up Turkey Ham- is it Turkey or is it Ham.
    Does this mean droves of 2CV driving lentil eaters will be making their way over to Ramsbottom in September for the World Black Pudding Throwing Championships from Hebden Bridge to claim the title from Lancashire?
    I presume not, as the puds will not conform to the correct competition weigh t and aerodynamic proportions.

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  2. Veggie Black Pudding- yet more silliness, presumably from the people who thought up Turkey Ham- is it Turkey or is it Ham.
    Does this mean droves of 2CV driving lentil eaters will be making their way over to Ramsbottom in September for the World Black Pudding Throwing Championships from Hebden Bridge to claim the title from Lancashire?
    I presume not, as the puds will not conform to the correct competition weigh t and aerodynamic proportions.

    Like

  3. It might come as a shock to you, but many vegetarians might well have enjoyed the taste of various kinds of meat, as I once did 16 years back, but the point is, if you enjoy something that involves cruelty and causing massive amounts of suffering for other intelligent living creatures, should you then still go ahead and do it? I’m sure if a broke into your house and stole all your money spending it would give me pleasure, yet one doesn’t do it because it is morally reprehensible. Not such a difficult point to grasp really, is it?

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  4. It might come as a shock to you, but many vegetarians might well have enjoyed the taste of various kinds of meat, as I once did 16 years back, but the point is, if you enjoy something that involves cruelty and causing massive amounts of suffering for other intelligent living creatures, should you then still go ahead and do it? I’m sure if a broke into your house and stole all your money spending it would give me pleasure, yet one doesn’t do it because it is morally reprehensible. Not such a difficult point to grasp really, is it?

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  5. As a veggie of 14 years, I have (too) often been asked the question, “Why would you want to eat something that resembles meat?” Well why not? Unless you’re repulsed by the sight of meat products, then it’s nice to have additional choice in your diet. I don’t mind physically handling meat; often cooking meat products for my wife and cooked breakfast for my hung over mates. As long as I’m not eating it myself, I personally don’t see the problem. I draw the line at fish though; I’ve NEVER liked the look or smell of fish. Yuk! Don’t get me wrong; I wouldn’t be short of things to make/eat if I stopped buying meat-style-products. On a weekly basis I make my own curries, chillies, soups & pasta meals etc., all without the use of Soya or quorn to represent the meat aspect of a dish. But it’s just nice to have a different product in your diet as an option. Take breakfasts for instance. Sure I can have a variety or cereals and/or toast with various toppings on. I do eat eggs. I’ve even cook a ‘full English’ using mushrooms, tomatoes, eggs, beans & toast/fried bread. And yummy it is too; even my meat-eating-friends have said so. But yeah, occasionally it is nice to have that meat substitute option. But just because I have the odd veggie sausage, veggie style bacon & veggie black pudding (V Pud), it doesn’t mean that I’m CRAVING meat. I’m certainly not repulsed that a blend of Soya, quorn (or whatever) that just happens to be rolled into a sausage shape. I use Soya Beanfeasts to create ‘spag bol’ or Sheppard’s pies; then again, I make those dishes without using meat substitute products. It’s just a choice thing, not a craving. I think Michael (July 22, 2006) has summed it up in fewer words than I have. And as he points out; some veggies might still enjoy the taste of meat, just not the concept of where it comes from. As I said earlier; I have been a veggie for 14 years, but I was a meat eater for 21 years prior to that… Hope my thoughts on the topic are of use.

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  6. As a veggie of 14 years, I have (too) often been asked the question, “Why would you want to eat something that resembles meat?” Well why not? Unless you’re repulsed by the sight of meat products, then it’s nice to have additional choice in your diet. I don’t mind physically handling meat; often cooking meat products for my wife and cooked breakfast for my hung over mates. As long as I’m not eating it myself, I personally don’t see the problem. I draw the line at fish though; I’ve NEVER liked the look or smell of fish. Yuk! Don’t get me wrong; I wouldn’t be short of things to make/eat if I stopped buying meat-style-products. On a weekly basis I make my own curries, chillies, soups & pasta meals etc., all without the use of Soya or quorn to represent the meat aspect of a dish. But it’s just nice to have a different product in your diet as an option. Take breakfasts for instance. Sure I can have a variety or cereals and/or toast with various toppings on. I do eat eggs. I’ve even cook a ‘full English’ using mushrooms, tomatoes, eggs, beans & toast/fried bread. And yummy it is too; even my meat-eating-friends have said so. But yeah, occasionally it is nice to have that meat substitute option. But just because I have the odd veggie sausage, veggie style bacon & veggie black pudding (V Pud), it doesn’t mean that I’m CRAVING meat. I’m certainly not repulsed that a blend of Soya, quorn (or whatever) that just happens to be rolled into a sausage shape. I use Soya Beanfeasts to create ‘spag bol’ or Sheppard’s pies; then again, I make those dishes without using meat substitute products. It’s just a choice thing, not a craving. I think Michael (July 22, 2006) has summed it up in fewer words than I have. And as he points out; some veggies might still enjoy the taste of meat, just not the concept of where it comes from. As I said earlier; I have been a veggie for 14 years, but I was a meat eater for 21 years prior to that… Hope my thoughts on the topic are of use.

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  7. I am a strict vegan, but had I ever actually liked the taste of black pudding when I was a meat-eater, I would be happy to try a vegan version of black pudding now that I’m vegan. I see no reason why not – it would replace any craving I may have for the stuff, and does not involve cruelty to animals, so how on earth can anyone with a tiny bit of sense consider it to be an oxymoron? Being vegetarian or vegan is about not taking part in animal cruelty, it’s not about the way something tastes.

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  8. I am a strict vegan, but had I ever actually liked the taste of black pudding when I was a meat-eater, I would be happy to try a vegan version of black pudding now that I’m vegan. I see no reason why not – it would replace any craving I may have for the stuff, and does not involve cruelty to animals, so how on earth can anyone with a tiny bit of sense consider it to be an oxymoron? Being vegetarian or vegan is about not taking part in animal cruelty, it’s not about the way something tastes.

    Like

  9. I hate the closed mindedness wwith which some meaters seem to approach vegetarianism. I have a been a vegetarian for years and have always respected other peoples wish to eat meat and I dont think it is too much to ask to just return that same respect. I have my reasons for being a veggie and they are obviously important to me so why disparage it?
    I used to enjoy the taste of meat and often try to create veggie variations of traditionally meat dishes and having cooked for non-veggies too they always are pleasantly surprised by what you can do with it. I am delighted the range of meat substitutes is growing as it gives us more options to work with.

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  10. I hate the closed mindedness wwith which some meaters seem to approach vegetarianism. I have a been a vegetarian for years and have always respected other peoples wish to eat meat and I dont think it is too much to ask to just return that same respect. I have my reasons for being a veggie and they are obviously important to me so why disparage it?
    I used to enjoy the taste of meat and often try to create veggie variations of traditionally meat dishes and having cooked for non-veggies too they always are pleasantly surprised by what you can do with it. I am delighted the range of meat substitutes is growing as it gives us more options to work with.

    Like

  11. Like many of the people above, the reason I do not eat meat is because I cannot justify an animal dying just for me to stuff my face. I ate meat up until the age of 4 when I was told where meat came from.
    It wasn’t because I didn’t enjoy the taste, hence why I buy “meat style” products.
    And I don’t drive a 2CV either, that’s very narrow minded of you.

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  12. Like many of the people above, the reason I do not eat meat is because I cannot justify an animal dying just for me to stuff my face. I ate meat up until the age of 4 when I was told where meat came from.
    It wasn’t because I didn’t enjoy the taste, hence why I buy “meat style” products.
    And I don’t drive a 2CV either, that’s very narrow minded of you.

    Like

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