What’s a tip for?

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TIPPING is fast becoming a tricky issue to navigate. As my colleague Simon Donohue points out in today’s M.E.N; “those of us who have grown up sandwiched neatly between the tight-fisted and the downright flashy must now pick our way through an entire world of etiquette.”
Leaving aside, for a moment, my concerns abut who actually receives the money , what is the tip for?
I’ve always taken it to be a reward for good service, a small token for a person who goes out of their way above what’s expected of their job.
A good waiter/ess doesn’t just deliver the food with a smile, they are knowledgeable about the menu, can recommend dishes or wine and make you feel that nothing’s too much trouble.
But there’s also a widely held view that the tip reflects the quality of the cooking – or perhaps the whole dining experience.
If the food is rubbish, the venue draughty and the seats uncomfortable should you still tip if the service is excellent?
I’d say yes but I’d love to hear your experiences.
And while we’re on the topic of tipping, it seems that my petition to get tips or services charges paid over to those who actually serve hasn’t got much support yet. Come on, these staff don’t get paid that much and if you bothered to give a tip, don’t you want it to be handed on?

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8 thoughts on “What’s a tip for?

  1. Well to say true most of the restaurants keep the service charge for them self and share cc and cash tips between stuff with some kind of system witch is absolutley not transparent to customer so noone can prove anything or acctualy know what is happening to the tip after they leave the premisses.

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  2. Well to say true most of the restaurants keep the service charge for them self and share cc and cash tips between stuff with some kind of system witch is absolutley not transparent to customer so noone can prove anything or acctualy know what is happening to the tip after they leave the premisses.

    Like

  3. As a customer at San Carlo i asked many times whats happening to my tip. The waiters had diferent answers: like we hawe to say it go to us, or we dont get any of service charge at all onley cash we share.

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  4. As a customer at San Carlo i asked many times whats happening to my tip. The waiters had diferent answers: like we hawe to say it go to us, or we dont get any of service charge at all onley cash we share.

    Like

  5. I personally think there should be a goverment organization keeping close eye on all tips and service charge gained by the restaurants and hotels. There are a lot of bad business practise in this industry and there will be a tremendous amount of explaination to be done by certain parties involved. Most of the employees are not brave enough to highlight any of these issues as they will lose their job as the consequences and there was no proper direction where this similar type of complaint can be made to.

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  6. I personally think there should be a goverment organization keeping close eye on all tips and service charge gained by the restaurants and hotels. There are a lot of bad business practise in this industry and there will be a tremendous amount of explaination to be done by certain parties involved. Most of the employees are not brave enough to highlight any of these issues as they will lose their job as the consequences and there was no proper direction where this similar type of complaint can be made to.

    Like

  7. Having being a waitress before in my student years, I can say that many places put a service charge on the bill which the staff do not get at all, but nevertheless it is written on the bill that the staff benefit from it. What they do is to use the money from the service charge to top up staff wages, say the “hourly rate” is £4.20 and the rest is top up with the service charge up to the minimum wage imposed by the government. To cover their backs they give to the staff an hourly rate of £6, which is a little bit higher than the minimum wage, currently at £5.25, so that they can say the staff is benefiting from it.
    I think it is a good idea that the unions are bringing this matter to the public, because for the people working in the catering industry it is very hard to see how you do not get anything from your tips after a hard day of work.
    I would urge to the public not to pay a service charge and if they feel the waiter/waitress deserve it, to tip personally(in cash) so that they ensure that the person will get the tip.
    This is the case for example of Potters Bar and Kitchen at the Trafford Centre, if you visit the place, please DO NOT PAY THE SERVICE CHARGE, because even if you enquiry to the staff they will not tell you the truth as they are not allowed to as per company policy.

    Like

  8. Having being a waitress before in my student years, I can say that many places put a service charge on the bill which the staff do not get at all, but nevertheless it is written on the bill that the staff benefit from it. What they do is to use the money from the service charge to top up staff wages, say the “hourly rate” is £4.20 and the rest is top up with the service charge up to the minimum wage imposed by the government. To cover their backs they give to the staff an hourly rate of £6, which is a little bit higher than the minimum wage, currently at £5.25, so that they can say the staff is benefiting from it.
    I think it is a good idea that the unions are bringing this matter to the public, because for the people working in the catering industry it is very hard to see how you do not get anything from your tips after a hard day of work.
    I would urge to the public not to pay a service charge and if they feel the waiter/waitress deserve it, to tip personally(in cash) so that they ensure that the person will get the tip.
    This is the case for example of Potters Bar and Kitchen at the Trafford Centre, if you visit the place, please DO NOT PAY THE SERVICE CHARGE, because even if you enquiry to the staff they will not tell you the truth as they are not allowed to as per company policy.

    Like

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