When is a pea, a pea?

peaAs part of an occasional series we’ll just call ‘pretentious?moi?’, I offer you pea texture. Mushy, juice, sprouts or crushed are obviously so passé, the humble pea needs a new image and so here’s just the texture of pea rather then the whole vegetable to clutter up your plate with their devious little catch-me-if-you-can spheres.

Or maybe there’s a part of the sentence missing, perhaps it should read – ‘textures of pea, fragrance of hummingbird and speed of cheetah’ or some such?

Restauranteurs, I salute your ingenuity and offer a space to celebrate it here. Any other examples gratefully received and shared here – just drop me a comment, an email or a tweet.

The dish was actually extremely good, and inthe end it turned out they were just peas with some pea juice.
The rest of the meal at Leyburn’s Sandpiper Inn, was excellent, the service very professional and the whole effect very non-pretentious – a gastropub well worth a visit if you’re in the vicinity.

Chart to show every ‘new cupcake’ ever mentioned

This is a fun infographic – Every food that’s ever been called ‘The New Cupcake,’ in one chart.

Amazingly there’s been 57 items that have been called ‘the new cupcake’. Crazy times indeed.

It was created by Slate which explains:

We searched news database Nexis for the phrase “the new cupcake” and tallied every instance of its use in English language publications, whether it was a writer declaring doughnuts “the new cupcakes,” wondering whether frozen yogurt was the “new cupcake,” or quoting someone else asserting that pie was “the new cupcake.”

Hundreds of viewers complain about the latest Marmite ad

In just 24 hours, the Advertising Standards Authority received 250 complaints about this ad.

Marmite trailed the advert’s debut, during Monday’s Coronation Street on ITV, on its Facebook page and The BBC reports it received mixed responses following its broadcast.

“This ad shows no regard for all those involved with animal welfair [sic] and I personaly [sic] will no longer eat Marmite till this ad is pulled,” wrote one.

Funny or tactless? Have your say below.

Need a faster food order? Deploying drones for home delivery

Forget supermarket vans, how would you like your groceries be delivered by drone? And why beat eggs, sugar and other messy ingredients – just print off that sugary coating on your cute cupcake?

Neither development is that that far-fetched it seems – these are just two technology-meets-food stories I’ve noticed this week.

First of all the drone delivery vehicle – take a look here where your high street pizza provider Dominos’s shows off its ‘DomiCopter’.

It got a writer at Esquire magazine wondering ‘about drones. About the possibilities they hold for the American consumer. About their ethicality.’

“And even though it was presumably just a PR stunt, and FAA approval for commercial drone use is still a few years off, I find myself thinking that, if it did happen, I’d have a few questions.”

Yes, I think we can safely say we’d all have some questions on that……

So what about printed cakes? This is taking technology more commonly associated with engineering feats, 3D printing, and turning it over to sugar and spice and all things nice.

In a rather breathless interview with The Guardian’s technology section, husband and wife team in LA, Kyle and Liz von Hasseln, explain.

“It’s such an exciting intersection between technology, food, and art. We’ve been getting excited reactions from all over the world. When you see a 3D-printed sugar sculpture that’s unlike any food you’ve seen before, its immediately clear that a whole new set of possibilities has opened up.”

Still…… sounds like the printable lamb chop might be a way off.

Audio: BBC Radio 4 takes a look at the food industry for The Bottom Line

I caught this radio programme about the food industry this afternoon and, if you’re interested in how the food supply chain in the UK works, it’s well worth a ‘listen again’.

Presenter Evan Davis finds out from three very different food companies about how their supply chains work and how much oversight any company leader can have. Guests discuss how to create an efficient and cost effective system that delivers on quality and safety. Do consumers elsewhere in Europe and the world demand the same level of locally-sourced credentials as the British now do and are these ideals worthwhile?

The guests are:
Alastair Storey, CEO, WSH
Perween Warsi, CEO, S&A Foods
Gavin Darby, CEO, Premier Foods

The podcast can be downloaded here.

 

Observer Food Monthly photo competition open to all

teaonthetrainThe newly-launched Guardian Witness website is running a food photography contest. The assignment says:

This year the OFM Awards have a category for best food photography – which you could win. So if you’re into snapping street food or beautiful produce, home-cooked meals or fantastic creations in local restaurants – we’d like to see your images. The best will be published on the Guardian site and the winning picture will be printed in the magazine

So far there’s a wide mixture of pictures – everything from a plate of chips to a fruit market in Spain – like most food bloggers I’ve, not unsurprisingly, got heaps of food snaps which might fit the bill but in the end I decided to restrict myself and submitted my favourite picture from last week’s TeaonTheTrain event.